Most Common Pediatric Eye Exam Questions Hero

Most Common Pediatric Eye Exam Questions

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The American Optometric Association recommends that children as young as 6 months old  undergo a pediatric eye exam. Identifying eye problems early is important because vision is crucial for a child’s development. Children need good near and distance eyesight, eye movement skills, hand-eye coordination, and other visual skills for learning.

Eye Exam

Before you schedule your child’s eye exam, your experienced, local pediatric eye doctor in Brooklyn, NY’s Park Slope neighborhood, Dr. Justin Bazan answers some questions about pediatric eye exams:

How Frequently Should I Schedule an Eye Exam for My Child?

Eye doctors can examine infants as young as 6 months and children 3 years old every year or as needed.

What is Included in the Eye Exam?

Most eye exams include case history, vision testing, eye health evaluation, eye alignment testing, and prescription of eyewear (if needed).

Is My Child’s Medical History Relevant?

Yes, you should share your child’s medical history, including any complications during childbirth. Tell the doctor if your child has a history of prematurity, delayed motor development, or poor eye tracking skills. This way, we can determine if your child needs vision therapy.

Do I Have to Tell Doctors about My Family’s Health History?

Keep in mind that some eye conditions are hereditary. If your family has a history of eye conditions, your child is at a higher risk of this condition.

What Tests Do You Conduct for Infants?

Some of the common tests for infants include pupil responses, preferential looking, and fixation/focus. For pupil response, this evaluates if the pupils open and close properly in the absence or presence of light. We also check if the baby can fixate on an object and follow it as it moves. For preferential tracking, we use cards with blank and striped sides to attract the baby’s attention.

What Tests Do You Conduct for Children?

Common tests for children include retinoscopy, LEA symbols, and random dot stereopsis. Retinoscopy evaluates the back of the eye while random dot stereopsis uses dot patterns and three-dimensional glasses to assess how your child’s eyes work together. The use of LEA symbols is like a typical eye chart test, but with symbols instead of letters.

You can trust the eye doctors at Park Slope Eye for all your child’s eye care needs. We specialize in comprehensive eye exams, corrective contact lenses and eyeglasses, ortho-k lenses, and dry eye treatment in Brooklyn, NY.

If you have more questions about pediatric eye care, you can call us at (347) 380-7070.

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  • Written by Justin Bazan

    Dr. Justin Bazan is a 2004 SUNY College of Optometry graduate. He established Park Slope Eye in 2008 with the goal of providing high quality eyecare and incredible eyewear for the neighborhood. He has a true passion for optometry and stay up to date with the current research and trends. He is active in the profession and holds several leadership positions on the local, state and national levels. Dr. Bazan is a Park Slope local and can often be seen out in the neighborhood so be sure to say Hi next time you see him!

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